General

Open comments on the DTI blogging promo final draft thing

To those who are concerned (this would include bloggers who make money online and agencies who tap bloggers for campaigns), the ongoing DTI thing really sucks but there’s a final draft being spread online with comments due till the 19th. Would be great if you could read it, be informed and send a note to Juned or Tonyo as they are appointed members of a committee that will work on this for us.

I mean yeah, let’s just get this over and done with.

The full report can be found here (in blog format by Juned) and here (in Scribd format by Tonyo). Deadline for comments is on the 19th. Best we say what’s on our minds.

The crux of the report, however is in the last part. These are the recommendations and I will paste it all here:

RECOMMENDATION

The BTRCP recommends the following:

1. Individual bloggers are not required to file and secure sales promo permit.

2. Individuals who work with companies or are being utilized by companies in their product advertising and marketing using blogs must file and secure sales promo permit.

3. Businesses who use blogging as their venue for product advertising and marketing should file the sales promo permit application.

4. Blogging community must police themselves and determine those professional bloggers who use blogs associated with business.

5. DTI – NCR should brief IMMAP member associations/organizations to have them familiarized with DAO No. 10-02, Series of 2010 and JAO No. 01, Series of 2008 stating the rules and regulations on Sales Promotion and Electronic Commerce.

Comments:

1. Regards to recommendation #2, it should clearly be stated that this should only apply if a sale is involved. Raffles and contests should not be included.

2. I’m all for DTI permits in order to prevent Mickey Mouse campaigns but applying for one should be made easier. And when I say easier, it should be done online and ready within the hour. The DTI should push itself to adapt to these changes and that is the only time the industry can take them seriously. Apply online. Ready in an hour. Delivered to your email. Otherwise the whole thing is a joke and can potentially lead to another venue for milking the cow and corruption.

3. The permit should be applied for by the agency or company that sponsors the contest, not the supplier of the service. In this regard, #1 and #2 are confusing when put together.

4. Good luck with #4. It’s a vague call to action.

5. Let’s clearly define “business.” Does it mean an exchange of goods (x-deal) or making money? It’s vague.

6. Let’s clearly define “professional.” Because you only become a professional “something” if you’re cashing in around 40% (I may be mistaken with the percentage) of your total income. So if, say, you’re making PHP 100,000 a month and PHP 40,000 comes from blogging while the rest comes from your sideline as a circus clown, you are considered “professional” in your blogging field. What if this income isn’t fixed? Also, will it matter? The permit only applies to cash sales promotions.

7. Let’s condense the whole thing into one rule: Corporations that do online campaigns with a sales component need DTI permits. Application for permits should fall on the responsibility of the sponsor.

That’s all. Hope you chime in.

Draft DTI Final Report on online sales promotions by bloggers

About the author

Jayvee Fernandez

Jayvee Fernandez is a tech enthusiast, EAN certified SCUBA Diver and underwater photographer based in Metro Manila, Philippines. His photos and videos have appeared in various international and local publications including Random House Germany, Discovery Channel Canada, and CNN.

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